Wild Nothing: Nuanced Pop At 8,500 Feet With freezing hands and an adventurous spirit, Wild Nothing performs a stripped-down version of its song "This Chain Won't Break" on the side of the Mount San Jacinto peak near Palm Springs, Calif.

Field Recordings

Wild Nothing: Nuanced Pop At 8,500 FeetKCRW

When most people think of Palm Springs, visions of softly baked desert landscapes come to mind. However, upon arriving at the Palm Springs Aerial Tramway, we were warned that the temperature differential between the desert and the top cliff of the Chino Canyon was about 30 degrees — cold enough that it would require warm clothing and an adventurous spirit. But Wild Nothing singer-songwriter Jack Tatum and his tour players were game to load onto the rotating tram car and ascend to more than 8,500 feet above sea level.

Abandoning extraneous gear at the Tramway landing, both the band and our crew hiked down into the San Bernardino National Forest and then up onto a side of the Mount San Jacinto peak. With rapidly freezing hands, the band performed its song "This Chain Won't Break" for this Field Recording with a stripped-down assortment of instruments (two guitars, an amplified iPad, a bunch of dried tree pods turned into a makeshift shaker), giving this ode to a challenged relationship a much more nuanced, somber feel.

Once our feet were solidly back on the desert floor, the members of Wild Nothing were surprised to come across a group of fans who'd recognized the band from its recent Coachella performance. We toasted the chance meeting with some local wine and a random piece of sheet cake — and took the requisite Instagram pictures — before setting out for warmer climes.

Producers: Saidah Blount, Mito Habe-Evans, Amy Schriefer, Collin Walzak; Videographers: Mito Habe-Evans, Gabriella Garcia-Pardo, Mikey Harboldt; Audio Engineer: Kevin Wait; Special thanks to the Ace Hotel Palm Springs; Executive Producers: Anya Grundmann and Keith Jenkins

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