Joy Kills Sorrow On Mountain Stage The bluegrass band draws influence from the worlds of jazz, pop and rock in its innovative arrangements. Here, the group covers The Postal Service's classic "Such Great Heights" with mastery.

Joy Kills Sorrow performs live on Mountain Stage. Brian Blauser/Mountain Stage hide caption

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Brian Blauser/Mountain Stage

Joy Kills Sorrow performs live on Mountain Stage.

Brian Blauser/Mountain Stage

Mountain Stage

Joy Kills Sorrow On Mountain Stage

Joy Kills Sorrow On Mountain Stage

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Joy Kills Sorrow makes its second appearance on Mountain Stage, recorded live at the Culture Center Theater in Charleston, W.V. With its bluegrass roots — the band's name is a play on the call letters of the Indiana radio station that broadcast the Monroe Brothers in the 1930s — Joy Kills Sorrow draws influence from the worlds of jazz, pop and rock in its innovative arrangements.

The group's set includes a cover of The Postal Service's electro-pop classic "Such Great Heights," handled with a mastery that makes it sound as if the song belonged to Joy Kills Sorrow all along. Emma Beaton is the group's lead singer, while mandolin player Jake Jolliff is responsible for Joy Kills Sorrow's hard-driving rhythms. They're joined by banjo player Wes Corbett, guitarist Matt Arcara and the band's newest member, bassist Zoe Guigueno.

Set List

  • "Was It You"
  • "Gold In The Deep"
  • "Working For The Devil"
  • "Such Great Heights"
  • "Get Along"
  • "New Man"
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