The Wu-Force: globalFEST 2014 Hear a brand-new band featuring clawhammer banjo player Abigail Washburn. The Wu-Force merges Appalachian folk and a punk sensibility with traditional Chinese music.

globalFEST

The Wu-Force 2014

The Wu-Force: globalFEST 2014

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If you've encountered banjo phenomenon Abigail Washburn before, you might know that she's loved China for a long time. In fact, it was her plan to study law at Beijing University that led her to her chosen instrument a little more than a decade ago: She'd wanted to bring "something American" with her to China and started to learn old-time music — and found her destiny.

She never gave up her love of Chinese music and culture; at the Tiny Desk Concert she recorded for NPR Music back in 2011, she and her band performed a song she'd learned in Sichuan Province. In a newly formed trio called The Wu Force with multi-instrumentalist Kai Welch and guzheng (plucked zither) artist Wu Fei — a group self-described as a "Kungfu-Appalachian-Indie-Folk-Rock trio" — the three create new music inspired by everything from Peking opera to American punk. Their sound and staging are a little loopy, but The Wu-Force's interplay of fearless instrumentation, delicate playing and intriguing storytelling makes for a memorable set.

Set List

  • "Muckrakers"
  • "Uyghur Gaga"
  • "Cindy's Little Hand"
  • "Swallow Bridge"
  • "Good Girl"
  • "Han Ren"
  • "Piao"
  • "Yali Da"
  • "Wu-Force Anthem"
  • "Superpower Showdown"
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