DakhaBrakha: globalFEST 2014 The group mixes everything from punk-pop to traditional Ukrainian songs in cool yet beguiling textures, often with the close harmonies usually associated with Balkan music.

Front Row

DakhaBrakha: globalFEST 2014

Hear DakhaBrakha Live At globaFEST 2014

  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/260266576/262513203" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

It's hard to know what to make of Ukrainian band DakhaBrakha when it first arrives on stage — but, oh, those tall, furry hats! But from the first moment the group starts performing, it's hard not to get caught up in the magic it weaves.

Founded by former underground theater performers, DakhaBrakha possesses an incredible stage presence that transcends its eclectic repertoire and instrumentation — which includes spacious vocals, accordion, bass drum, mouth harp and cello. The group mixes everything from punk-pop to traditional Ukrainian songs in cool yet beguiling textures, often with the close harmonies usually associated with Balkan music. But it's really the live shows that take DakhaBrakha beyond mere curiosity to utter brilliance.

SET LIST:

  • "Tataryn (Tatar)"
  • "Sho Z-Pod Duba (Under The Oak)"
  • "Oy Za Lisochkom (Over The Forest)"
  • "Vesna (Spring)"
  • "Gvove (Especially For You)"
  • "Yagudky"
  • "Dibrova (Berries)"
  • "Yanky"

CREDITS:

Producers: Mito Habe-Evans, Anastasia Tsioulcas; Videographers: Olivia Merrion, A.J. Wilhelm; Editor: Gabriella Garcia-Pardo; Audio Engineer: Kevin Wait; Event Coordinator: Saidah Blount; Special Thanks: globalFEST, Webster Hall; Executive Producers: Anya Grundmann.

[+] read more[-] less

More From World

Taimane plays a Tiny Desk Concert (Laura Beltran Villamizar/NPR). Laura Beltrán Villamizar /NPR hide caption

toggle caption Laura Beltrán Villamizar /NPR

Taimane

Within the first moments of Taimane's magical set, we hear her play fiery flamenco, a famous phrase from the opera Carmen, a touch of Bach and more than a nod to her Hawaiian homeland.

Rising Appalachia performs during tiny desk on November, 19, 2019. (Photo by Mhari Shaw/NPR) Mhari Shaw/NPR hide caption

toggle caption Mhari Shaw/NPR

Rising Appalachia

The Atlanta-based band came to NPR in a van packed with a bodhrán (Irish drum), an ngoni (West African harp) a huge gourd, a cello, a baritone guitar and more.

Koffee plays a Tiny Desk Concert Laura Beltran Villamizar/NPR hide caption

toggle caption Laura Beltran Villamizar/NPR

Koffee

The fast-rising teenager from Jamaica just won a Grammy for Best Reggae Album, making her the first woman and youngest artist to ever win in the category.

Snarky Puppy performs during a Tiny Desk Concert on Sept. 12, 2019. Emily Bogle/NPR hide caption

toggle caption Emily Bogle/NPR

Snarky Puppy

The jazz, funk and gospel improv group brought jams and joy to the Tiny Desk.

Burna Boy performs during a Tiny Desk concert on Sept. 16, 2019. Mhari Shaw/NPR hide caption

toggle caption Mhari Shaw/NPR

Burna Boy

The Nigerian singer and songwriter is one of the biggest African artists in the world and a pioneer of Afro-fusion, an inescapable sound this year.

Kokoko! performs during a Tiny Desk concert, on Oct. 1, 2019. (Mhari Shaw/NPR) Mhari Shaw/NPR hide caption

toggle caption Mhari Shaw/NPR

KOKOKO!

KOKOKO! are sonic warriors. They seized control of the Tiny Desk, shouting their arrival through a megaphone, while electronic sirens begin to blare.

Rio Mira plays a Tiny Desk Concert (Shuran Huang/NPR). Shuran Huang/NPR hide caption

toggle caption Shuran Huang/NPR

Rio Mira

Rio Mira's music celebrates life along the river that separates Ecuador and Colombia: soft breezes, loving friends, the embrace of Africa and lots of festejando!

A-WA plays a Tiny Desk Concert (Bob Boilen/NPR). Bob Boilen/NPR hide caption

toggle caption Bob Boilen/NPR

A-WA

The three Israeli sisters in A-WA mix Yemenite and Arabic traditions with splashes of reggae and hip-hop.

47SOUL plays a Tiny Desk Concert on July 1, 2019 (Bob Boilen/NPR). Bob Boilen/NPR hide caption

toggle caption Bob Boilen/NPR

47SOUL

47SOUL's message of equality is meant for the world. It's music without borders, mixing old and new, acoustic and electronic from a band formed in Amman Jordan, singing in Arabic and English.

Back To Top