Beers And Lovesick Doo-Wop: At Home With Los Romanticos For the first installment in the Mi Casa Es Tu Casa series with Fusion, a Mexican band invites Alt.Latino into its house for lively conversation and great music.

Music Documentaries

Mi Casa Es Tu Casa: Los Romanticos De Zacatecas

Ever since I moved to Mexico City, I've been overwhelmed by the amount of music at my fingertips. I'm not just talking about amazing concerts: So many artists from all over Latin America live here in Mexico, and I love being here to check in on their creative process.

We started the series Mi Casa Es Tu Casa with Fusion based on that concept; the idea of catching musicians in their most comfortable setting, and having them go beyond performances and into the DNA of their art.

Today, Alt.Latino and Fusion kick off the series with a band called Los Romanticos de Zacatecas, whose members are as fun as they are talented. The group, which combines lovesick doo-wop with garage-rock humor, recently invited us into its house for beers, conversation (including a lesson in the history of Zacatecas) and, of course, great music.

Credits

Producers: Jasmine Garsd, Mito Habe-Evans, Diana Oliva Cave; Audio Engineer: Omar Morales; Editor: Mito Habe-Evans; Supervising Producer: Jessica Goldstein; Executive Producers: Anya Grundmann, Mark Lima

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