Jon Batiste And Stay Human, Live In Concert Following a high-energy main stage set — filled with turbocharged versions of standards, rags and his own party anthems — the young pianist and singer brought his band out into the audience.

Toast Of The Nation

Jon Batiste And Stay Human: Newport Jazz 2014

Jon Batiste And Stay Human In Concert

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Jon Batiste has a way with exits, as musicians from New Orleans tend to. Days before his day-ending set at the 2014 Newport Jazz Festival, the pianist and singer walked out of The Colbert Report's theater with a studio audience and a dancing Stephen Colbert in tow. And following a high-energy Newport set — where his expanded Stay Human band played turbocharged versions of standards, rags and his own party anthems — he switched from piano to melodica and led the band into the main stage audience.

Batiste's newest album is called Social Music, and it's easy to see how he could catalyze a gathering. As he paraded into the crowd, he switched into a number you might hear at a New Orleans jazz funeral parade, one that signaled his intent with a wink: "Just A Closer Walk With Thee."

Set List

  • "My Favorite Things"
  • "On The Sunny Side Of The Street"
  • "People In The World"
  • "Shreveport Stomp"
  • "It's Alright (Why You Gotta)"
  • "The Star-Spangled Banner"
  • "St. James Infirmary"
  • "The Entertainer"
  • "Just A Closer Walk With Thee"

Personnel

Jon Batiste, piano/melodica/voice; Eddie Barbash, alto saxophone; Ibanda Ruhumbika, tuba; Barry Stevenson, banjo/bass; Joe Saylor, drums; Jamison Ross, keyboard/percussion/voice. With Grace Kelly, alto saxophone.

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