'Braveheart' Writer 'Heartbroken' Over Scottish Referendum Braveheart, written by Randall Wallace, inspired a generation in Scotland. So much so that the core of supporters of Scottish independence have been referred to as the "Braveheart Generation."
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'Braveheart' Writer 'Heartbroken' Over Scottish Referendum

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'Braveheart' Writer 'Heartbroken' Over Scottish Referendum

'Braveheart' Writer 'Heartbroken' Over Scottish Referendum

'Braveheart' Writer 'Heartbroken' Over Scottish Referendum

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/349908346/349908347" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
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Braveheart, written by Randall Wallace, inspired a generation in Scotland. So much so that the core of supporters of Scottish independence have been referred to as the "Braveheart Generation."

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

So a sad day for backers of the movement for an independent Scotland.

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

But Scots have been in a corner before.

(SOUNDBITE OF FILM, "BRAVEHEART")

MEL GIBSON: (As William Wallace) They may take our lives but they'll never take our freedom.

SIEGEL: This is the battlefield speech from the film "Braveheart," depicting this 13th century Scottish hero.

(SOUNDBITE OF FILM, "BRAVEHEART")

GIBSON: (As William Wallace) I'm William Wallace.

RANDALL WALLACE: And I'm Randall Wallace, screenwriter of the 1995 film "Braveheart." When I got the news of the referendum, I was heartbroken - still am. I was really hoping that they would choose the path of independence.

BLOCK: Those in Scotland nursing an emotional letdown today may have Wallace, Randall Wallace, to blame for raising their hopes so high for independence. It seems the movie he wrote, "Braveheart," is a cultural touch point.

We've talked with a pollster who referred to the "Braveheart" generation, many just 30 to 50, who were the most ardent supporters of Scottish independence. Randall Wallace simply calls these fans Bravehearts.

WALLACE: I believe the people who've really responded to the movie have seen in that story an affirmation of a heart of courage. And courage means facing fear. Courage means facing difficulty. That's what it means to me.

SIEGEL: So it seems we could all be Bravehearts with or without the kilt.

WALLACE: Scotland forever, Alba gu brath.

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