Family Of Dallas Man With Ebola Quarantined As His Condition Worsens Thomas Eric Duncan, a Liberian man who was diagnosed with Ebola in Dallas, Texas, remains hospitalized in critical condition. The relatives he was living with are quarantined.

Family Of Dallas Man With Ebola Quarantined As His Condition Worsens

Family Of Dallas Man With Ebola Quarantined As His Condition Worsens

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Thomas Eric Duncan, a Liberian man who was diagnosed with Ebola in Dallas, Texas, remains hospitalized in critical condition. The relatives he was living with in Dallas are quarantined and have been moved out of the apartment they shared with the patient.

ARUN RATH, HOST:

Thomas Eric Duncan, the Liberian man diagnosed with Ebola in Dallas, remains hospitalized. But his condition has worsened. Health officials say he has gone from serious to critical condition. The four people he was living with have been moved out of the apartment they shared with Duncan. They remain quarantined. NPR's Sam Sanders spent time talking to people in Dallas and has this report.

SAM SANDERS, BYLINE: I am here at the Ivy Apartments, the complex where the man diagnosed with Ebola lived. It's a normal Saturday morning - families going to and fro, a group of young children playing soccer. I spoke with one of them.

So how far is his apartment from your apartment?

MOE OO: It's right - it's right there.

SANDERS: So you could see it every day?

OO: Yeah. We don't go near there.

SANDERS: That's Moe Oo. He says some people in the complex have left since the Ebola news broke. But his family is sticking around. Oo's mother is nearby watching him play. She gave him permission to talk to me. Oo says his mom has some pretty basic advice.

OO: My mom always says that you may never know who has the Ebola, so don't go near people that you don't know, like, stay with your friends.

SANDERS: Several people I spoke with at the complex said they're a little worried about Ebola, but not enough to leave. A postman walks by delivering the mail wearing a face mask. The apartment Duncan was living in was only cleaned out Friday, after authorities were criticized for leaving the four people who lived with him there for days amid possible contamination. They were finally moved to an undisclosed location last night. Dallas County Judge Clay Lewis Jenkins personally escorted those people out of the apartment last night. At a press conference Saturday, he urged calm.

(SOUNDBITE OF PRESS CONFERENCE)

CLAY LEWIS JENKINS: There's a lot of misinformation and erroneous fear along with the real information and understandable public health concern. But the people that are being monitored are real people too - people just like your family - who need your prayers.

SANDERS: Dr. David Lakey is the Commissioner of the Texas Department of State Health Services. And he says so far no one else seems to have contracted the virus.

DAVID LAKEY: We have no more cases. And we're very happy about that. We've identified everyone who may have had contact with him. And again, none of those individuals have any symptoms at this time.

SANDERS: Meanwhile, life goes on in Dallas. The Texas State Fair is happening in the city this weekend. Lori Uttinger is up from Conroe, Texas, for the fair with her family. Uttinger says she's assured them that they'll be OK.

Nothing to worry about?

LORI UTTINGER: Nothing to worry about, unless somebody throws up on you or, you know, or bleeds on you, don't worry about it.

SANDERS: Sean Belknap is at the fair as well, digging into a deep-fried red velvet cupcake with his wife Hillary.

HILLARY BELKNAP: It's a mess - a glorious fried mess.

SEAN BELKNAP: It's good.

H. BELKNAP: It's really good.

S. BELKNAP: Yeah, the icing makes it.

SANDERS: Sean Belknap says he really isn't worried about Ebola. It's not the biggest danger to people in Texas right now.

S. BELKNAP: I think you can catch the flu easier than you can catch Ebola, so it's kind of like if they have a handle on it, then what's there to worry about?

SANDERS: Officials say people in Dallas are safe, but nine people who came into contact with the patient remain under close surveillance. None are showing symptoms, but they'll be monitored for a while. And it'll be a least a month before officials can say for sure the risk of Ebola in the city is totally gone. Sam Sanders, NPR, News, Dallas.

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