Wynton Marsalis, Pedrito Martinez, Chucho Valdés: Jazz At Lincoln Center Opening Night Joined by special guests Pedrito Martinez (percussion) and Chucho Valdés (piano), the Jazz at Lincoln Center Orchestra premieres new music by Wynton Marsalis inspired by Afro-Cuban religious practice.
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Full Concert: The Jazz at Lincoln Center Orchestra feat. Pedrito Martinez and Chucho Valdés, 'Ochas'

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Building on the Jazz at Lincoln Center Orchestra's recent trip to Cuba, managing and artistic director Wynton Marsalis presents his newest large-scale work: Ochas, a suite for big band and Afro-Cuban percussion. He calls upon young superstar Pedrito Martinez, who brought along a trio of fellow hand percussionists, to execute the chants and rhythms of the batá drums specific to Santería religious practice. And he called upon virtuoso Cuban pianist Chucho Valdés to ignite the proceedings.

The performance launches Jazz at Lincoln Center's 2014-15 calendar and highlights its season-long theme "Jazz Across The Americas."

Set List

All compositions by Wynton Marsalis.

  • "Moyuba"
  • "Elegua"
  • "Ogún"
  • "Ochosi"
  • "Obatalá"
  • "Oshún"
  • "Oyá"
  • "Yemayá"
  • "Agayú Sola"
  • "Changó"

Personnel

Wynton Marsalis, trumpet/music director; Pedrito Martinez, batá/vocals; Chucho Valdés, piano. With the Jazz at Lincoln Center Orchestra: Kenny Rampton, trumpet; Marcus Printup, trumpet; Greg Gisbert, trumpet; Vincent Gardner, trombone; Chris Crenshaw, trombone; Elliot Mason, trombone; Sherman Irby, alto saxophone; Ted Nash, alto saxophone; Victor Goines, tenor saxophone; Walter Blanding, tenor saxophone; Paul Nedzela, baritone saxophone; Dan Nimmer, piano; Carlos Henriquez, bass; Ali Jackson, drums. Featuring Román Diaz, batá/vocals; Clemente Medina, batá/vocals; Dreiser Durruthy Bambolé, dance; Yesenia Fernandez Selier, dance; Denise DeJean, vocals; Amma Dawn McKen, vocals.

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