Washington, D.C. Election Guide Uses Upside-Down Flag The Washington Post reported the mistake. But officials contend it was really a brilliant ruse to get attention and fight voter apathy.

Washington, D.C. Election Guide Uses Upside-Down Flag

Washington, D.C. Election Guide Uses Upside-Down Flag

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The Washington Post reported the mistake. But officials contend it was really a brilliant ruse to get attention and fight voter apathy.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Steve Inskeep with this week's best excuse. The District of Columbia holds an election this fall. Washington made an election guide and decorated it with a D.C. flag - two red stripes, three red stars on top. But the guide shows the flag upside-down, stars on the bottom. The Washington Post reports it was a mistake, but officials contend it was really a brilliant ruse to get attention and fight voter apathy. Traditionally an upside-down flag is a signal of distress. It's MORNING EDITION.

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