Preview: George W. Bush Talks About Politics And His New Book Former President George W. Bush sat down with NPR's David Greene to discuss a book he's written about his father, the other ex-President Bush. This week, we'll hear their conversation.

Preview: George W. Bush Talks About Politics And His New Book

Preview: George W. Bush Talks About Politics And His New Book

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Former President George W. Bush sat down with NPR's David Greene to discuss a book he's written about his father, the other ex-President Bush. This week, we'll hear their conversation.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

This week on MORNING EDITION we talk politics with George W. Bush. The former president has written a book about the other President Bush - his father. He spoke about it with David Greene and their talk turned to two great political families - the Bushes and the Clintons - who each could have a presidential candidate 2016.

(SOUNDBITE OF ARCHIVED BROADCAST)

PRESIDENT GEORGE W. BUSH: I mean, the environment is what it is. You don't get to rewrite the environment and so Jeb has to think about whether or not he wants to be president, just like Hillary Clinton has to think about whether she wants to be president. Some guy one time said to me, you know, I don't like the idea of Bush, Clinton, Bush, Obama, Bush. I said OK. I said how do you like the idea of Bush, Clinton, Bush Obama, Clinton? And the point is is that these may be the two best candidates their party has to offer.

INSKEEP: In the coming days we'll have more of David's conversation with George W. Bush on MORNING EDITION from NPR News.

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