Very Very Henry Threadgill The saxophonist and composer has always pushed boundaries. Harlem Stage celebrates his career with a two-day concert retrospective of his various groundbreaking ensembles.
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Very Very Henry Threadgill

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Very Very Henry Threadgill

Very Very Henry Threadgill

Very Very Henry Threadgill

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We celebrate Threadgill's induction to the 2021 class of NEA Jazz Masters, with a rare retrospective from 2014 that celebrates the genius of Henry Threadgill.

Henry Threadgill's music has always pushed boundaries. Two tubas with two guitars, a "sextett" with seven members, a free-improvising trio with an instrument made of hubcaps, a dance orchestra: Nothing is off the table.

The saxophonist, flutist and composer is a newly appointed NEA Jazz Master. To celebrate, Jazz Night is revisiting a Harlem Stage retrospective from Threadgill's 70th Birthday, curated by pianist Jason Moran. Threadgill watched from the audience as dozens of musicians from all throughout his trajectory gathered in Harlem Stage's unique uptown venue to present a rare retrospective of his work.

Note: This episode originally aired Nov. 13, 2014.

Credits

Special thanks to Harlem Stage. Funding for the production of Very Very Threadgill was made possible by the generous support provided by the Mitzi and Warren Eisenberg Family Foundation, Roland Augustine and Lawrence Luhring, Lonti Ebers and Bruce Flatt, Deborah and Ronald Eisenberg Family Foundation, Susan and Leonard Feinstein Foundation, Connie and Jack Tilton, and Monica and David Zwirner.