Buffalo Bills Flag Officials For Excessive Celebration On Losing Play After an official signaled a touchdown for Denver in the Broncos' win, he and another ref exchanged a fist-bump. A player calls it proof of bias; the NFL says they were excited to get the call right.
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Buffalo Bills Flag Officials For Excessive Celebration On Losing Play

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Buffalo Bills Flag Officials For Excessive Celebration On Losing Play

Buffalo Bills Flag Officials For Excessive Celebration On Losing Play

Buffalo Bills Flag Officials For Excessive Celebration On Losing Play

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/369276274/369276275" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

After an official signaled a touchdown for Denver in the Broncos' win, he and another ref exchanged a fist-bump. A player calls it proof of bias; the NFL says they were excited to get the call right.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Steve Inkseep. The Buffalo Bills are not happy. As they lost to Denver, an official correctly called a Denver touchdown; another official fist-bumped him. A Bills player says this shows the refs were against his team. The NFL says the refs were just glad to get the call right. And by the way, the rules ban excessive celebration in the end zone, but the rule says it's only excessive if you celebrate after the referee tells you to stop. No ref told the refs to stop. It's MORNING EDITION.

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