Man Who Didn't Want His Name In A News Story, Is Now A Story Frederick County, Md., Council Member Kirby Delauter threatened a local reporter with a lawsuit for using his name in a story without permission. The Frederick News-Post responded in an editorial.
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Man Who Didn't Want His Name In A News Story, Is Now A Story

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Man Who Didn't Want His Name In A News Story, Is Now A Story

Man Who Didn't Want His Name In A News Story, Is Now A Story

Man Who Didn't Want His Name In A News Story, Is Now A Story

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/375543998/375544001" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Frederick County, Md., Council Member Kirby Delauter threatened a local reporter with a lawsuit for using his name in a story without permission. The Frederick News-Post responded in an editorial.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Steve Inskeep with congratulations to Kirby Delauter, who got his name in the paper. Mr. Delauter is an official in Frederick County, Maryland. He says the local paper is biased and must not use his name without permission. Thanks to the First Amendment, the paper did, publishing an editorial headline - "Kirby Delauter, Kirby Delauter, Kirby Delauter." Look at the 13 paragraphs of that editorial, and you notice the first letters of each spell Kirby Delauter. It's MORNING EDITION.

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