Next Cover Of 'Charlie Hebdo' Appears To Feature Prophet Muhammad The cover features an image apparently of Islam's prophet shedding a tear and holding a sign that reads: "Je Suis Charlie." It comes less than a week after a deadly attack on the magazine.

Next Cover Of 'Charlie Hebdo' Appears To Feature Prophet Muhammad

Next Cover Of 'Charlie Hebdo' Appears To Feature Prophet Muhammad

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The cover features an image apparently of Islam's prophet shedding a tear and holding a sign that reads: "Je Suis Charlie." It comes less than a week after a deadly attack on the magazine.

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Tomorrow marks one week since an attack on the editorial offices of the French satirical magazine Charlie Hebdo. It is also the day that next issue comes out. The press run is normally 60,000. Tomorrow's will be 3 million.

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

And a French newspaper posted what it said is an image of Charlie Hebdo cover. It's a cartoon of the Prophet Muhammad with a tear on his cheek.

MONTAGNE: Meanwhile, French police say they're looking for as many as six suspects who are believed to be involved in last week's crimes. That search suggests the attacks were the work of a terror cell, rather than a few lone wolves.

GREENE: In Paris today, French President Francois Hollande gave what is the nation's highest award, the Legion of Honuor, posthumously to the three police officers killed by Islamist militants. Throughout France, thousands of soldiers and police are guarding potential terror targets, including Jewish schools.

MONTAGNE: And in Israel today, the four people killed in a kosher supermarket in Paris are being buried. The funeral is being attended by the nation's leadership.

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