A Photoshopped Response Sticks Up For China's Plunging Necklines After a TV drama was yanked from Chinese airwaves so censors could cover up some low-cut outfits, snarky social media users have responded by Photoshopping coverings for cleavage everywhere.
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A Photoshopped Response Sticks Up For China's Plunging Necklines

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A Photoshopped Response Sticks Up For China's Plunging Necklines

A Photoshopped Response Sticks Up For China's Plunging Necklines

A Photoshopped Response Sticks Up For China's Plunging Necklines

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/377122781/377171600" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

After a TV drama was yanked from Chinese airwaves so censors could cover up some low-cut outfits, snarky social media users have responded by Photoshopping coverings for cleavage everywhere.

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Renee Montagne. China's social media is obsessed with a new Photoshopping opportunity - covering cleavage from Venus de Milo to Scarlett Johansson. This after the country's popular drama "The Empress Of China" was yanked from the airwaves briefly so sensors could cover up the low-cut bodices of the characters. The deeply cut gowns were apparently authentic to fashions of the seventh century, leaving outraged viewers, though, in the 21st. It's MORNING EDITION.

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