Bacon Blamed For China's Smog Problem An environmental official says smoking, the traditional method used to preserve pork, is polluting the air. As residents smoke meat in preparation for the Chinese New Year, the smog has increased.
NPR logo

Bacon Blamed For China's Smog Problem

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/378289377/378289378" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
Bacon Blamed For China's Smog Problem

Bacon Blamed For China's Smog Problem

Bacon Blamed For China's Smog Problem

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/378289377/378289378" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

An environmental official says smoking, the traditional method used to preserve pork, is polluting the air. As residents smoke meat in preparation for the Chinese New Year, the smog has increased.

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Good morning. I'm David Greene. As we've reported, China has a major smog problem. And now one environmental official thinks he's figured out the cause - breakfast, specifically bacon. The official says smoking, the traditional method used to preserve pork, is polluting the air. As local residents smoke delicious meat products in preparation for the Chinese New Year, the smog has increased. Still, this claim was met with some skepticism. Some say that at most, the air might smell like bacon. You're listening to MORNING EDITION.

Copyright © 2015 NPR. All rights reserved. Visit our website terms of use and permissions pages at www.npr.org for further information.

NPR transcripts are created on a rush deadline by Verb8tm, Inc., an NPR contractor, and produced using a proprietary transcription process developed with NPR. This text may not be in its final form and may be updated or revised in the future. Accuracy and availability may vary. The authoritative record of NPR’s programming is the audio record.