R.I. State Representative Wants Outdated Laws Scrapped John Edwards is sick of laws that have quote "no relevance in 2015." If he gets his way, one Rhode Island law that may be done away is the $5 fine for swearing.
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R.I. State Representative Wants Outdated Laws Scrapped

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R.I. State Representative Wants Outdated Laws Scrapped

R.I. State Representative Wants Outdated Laws Scrapped

R.I. State Representative Wants Outdated Laws Scrapped

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/383988590/383988591" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
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John Edwards is sick of laws that have quote "no relevance in 2015." If he gets his way, one Rhode Island law that may be done away is the $5 fine for swearing.

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Good morning. I'm David Greene. Rhode Island state representative John Edwards is sick of laws that have, quote, "no relevance in 2015." He's trying to form a committee to scrap outdated laws. And here's what's in it for you, Rhode Island residents, if he gets his way. You may now have the right to collect unlimited - unlimited - seaweed from public beaches to use as fertilizer. You'll have the right to swear without risking a $5 fine. And you'll be free to feed garbage to a swine without a permit. It's MORNING EDITION.

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