From 'Game Of Thrones' Pitch Letter: No One Is Safe A 22-year-old book proposal from George R.R. Martin to his publisher gives host Scott Simon a window into the early plotlines of the Game of Thrones fantasy series.

From 'Game Of Thrones' Pitch Letter: No One Is Safe

From 'Game Of Thrones' Pitch Letter: No One Is Safe

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/384503034/384503035" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

A 22-year-old book proposal from George R.R. Martin to his publisher gives host Scott Simon a window into the early plotlines of the Game of Thrones fantasy series.

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

A correction now. We did a story last week on a new anthonlogy of poems by Amiri Baraka. We said that Mr. Baraka had been a member of the Black Pather Party. He was not. We regret the error."Game Of Thrones" fans have learned this week that winter is not coming, at least not this year - that's "Winds of Winter," the latest installment in George R. R. Martin's epic fantasy series, "A Song Of Ice And Fire." But a book proposal from the author in 1993 was leaked from his publisher HarperCollins this week. It revealed some of George Martin's earliest ideas for the series.

Now, some are familiar - the Lannister-Stark rivalry, murder and revenge plots, a cascade of sudden and bloody deaths. But there are others that have not come to pass, including an unorthodox love triangle and a couple of dragon eggs in the forest. Hey, you can't make an epic without cracking a couple of dragon eggs.

What has stayed true over 22 years is the promise that George Martin made to his publisher - the cast will not always remain the same, he wrote. Old characters will die and new ones will be introduced. I want the reader to feel that no one is ever completely safe, not even the characters who seem to be the heroes. The suspense always ratchets up a notch when you know that any character can die at any time.

(SOUNDBITE OF "GAME OF THRONES" THEME SONG)

Copyright © 2015 NPR. All rights reserved. Visit our website terms of use and permissions pages at www.npr.org for further information.

NPR transcripts are created on a rush deadline by Verb8tm, Inc., an NPR contractor, and produced using a proprietary transcription process developed with NPR. This text may not be in its final form and may be updated or revised in the future. Accuracy and availability may vary. The authoritative record of NPR’s programming is the audio record.