A Sister Act Taps A Ghostly, Afro-Cuban Groove As Ibeyi, Lisa-Kainde and Naomi Diaz make soulful, percussive music rooted in their Yoruba heritage.
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A Sister Act Taps A Ghostly, Afro-Cuban Groove

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A Sister Act Taps A Ghostly, Afro-Cuban Groove

A Sister Act Taps A Ghostly, Afro-Cuban Groove

A Sister Act Taps A Ghostly, Afro-Cuban Groove

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Ibeyi is the duo of twin sisters Lisa-Kainde and Naomi Diaz. Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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Courtesy of the artist

Ibeyi is the duo of twin sisters Lisa-Kainde and Naomi Diaz.

Courtesy of the artist

The word Ibeyi means "twins" in Yoruba, a language and culture whose influence looms large in the lives of two young musicians who have claimed the word for themselves.

French-Cuban twins Lisa-Kainde and Naomi Diaz make soulful, percussive music inspired by their Yoruba heritage. Their new self-titled debut as Ibeyi is a series of reflections on love, death and family that spans countries as well as genres. The duo spoke with NPR's Rachel Martin; hear their conversation at the audio link.

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