D.C. Court Orders Row House Resident Not To Smoke In Washington, D.C., neighbors complained that Edwin Gray's cigarette smoke came through a hole in the row house basement, according to WJLA TV. The precedent-setting court order is temporary.

D.C. Court Orders Row House Resident Not To Smoke

D.C. Court Orders Row House Resident Not To Smoke

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In Washington, D.C., neighbors complained that Edwin Gray's cigarette smoke came through a hole in the row house basement, according to WJLA TV. The precedent-setting court order is temporary.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Steve Inskeep with a serious ban on second-hand smoke. Washington, D.C., residents gained a court order against Edwin Gray. The court told Mr. Gray to stop smoking in his own home. He lives in a row house attached to the home next door. D.C.'s Channel 7 says neighbors complain cigarette smoke came through a hole in the basement. D.C. has legalized marijuana, so it's now the case that Edwin Gray can smoke pot almost anywhere but cannot smoke anything in his own house. It's MORNING EDITION.

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