This Museum Lets You Play The Artist The Smithsonian has banned selfie sticks in its museums, but there's a new pro-selfie museum in Manila. It encourages visitors to "be part of art" by posing with 3-D versions of famous artworks.
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This Museum Lets You Play The Artist

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This Museum Lets You Play The Artist

This Museum Lets You Play The Artist

This Museum Lets You Play The Artist

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The Smithsonian has banned selfie sticks in its museums, but there's a new pro-selfie museum in Manila. It encourages visitors to "be part of art" by posing with 3-D versions of famous artworks.

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Good morning, I'm Renee Montagne. The Smithsonian just banned selfie sticks in its museums in Washington. But there is a pro-selfie museum just opened in Manila called Art In Island. It encourages visitors to be part of art by posing with three-dimensional versions of famous artworks. Examples from the museum's Facebook, a man holding a paint brush up to the "Mona Lisa," another walking out of the frame of van Gogh's "Starry Night." It's a new spin on life imitating art. It's MORNING EDITION.

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