SAT Prep Test Misquotes Taylor Swift The Princeton Review wanted to use a line from her song "Fifteen" as an example of bad grammar. The problem is the lyric in question was misquoted.
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SAT Prep Test Misquotes Taylor Swift

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SAT Prep Test Misquotes Taylor Swift

SAT Prep Test Misquotes Taylor Swift

SAT Prep Test Misquotes Taylor Swift

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The Princeton Review wanted to use a line from her song "Fifteen" as an example of bad grammar. The problem is the lyric in question was misquoted.

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Good morning. I'm David Greene. How hip is Princeton Review? Its SAT prep guide asked students to correct grammar in pop songs like Taylor Swift's song "Fifteen." The lyric - somebody tells you they love you, you've got to believe them. Sure, you've got to is wrong grammatically. But there's something else wrong here - the test, which misquoted Taylor. The actual lyric...

(SOUNDBITE OF SONG, "FIFTEEN")

TAYLOR SWIFT: (Singing) You're going to believe them.

GREENE: Taylor's response - you had one job, test people - one job. It's MORNING EDITION.

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