Songs We Love: Reptar, 'Cable' Once the horn section comes in to add an exclamation point to everything, there's no turning back.

Songs We Love: Reptar, 'Cable'

03Cable

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    Song
    Cable
    Album
    Lurid Glow
    Artist
    Reptar
    Label
    Joyful Noise
    Released
    2015

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Reptar's new album, Lurid Glow, is out now. Laura Tigerlily Thigpen/Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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Laura Tigerlily Thigpen/Courtesy of the artist

Reptar's new album, Lurid Glow, is out now.

Laura Tigerlily Thigpen/Courtesy of the artist

Athens, Ga., has churned out a steady stream of great bands in the last three decades, including R.E.M., Of Montreal, Drive-By Truckers, Neutral Milk Hotel, Brian Burton (a.k.a. Danger Mouse) and more. Reptar figured to join that list in 2012 with its full-length debut, Body Faucet. At the time, the dance-pop band was riding a wave of buzz from its energetic live shows and a successful EP, but Body Faucet gave listeners only a glimpse of the group's potential.

Where Body Faucet failed, Reptar's new Lurid Glow succeeds, as it captures and ultimately corrals the essence of an almost absurdist live sound. That's never truer than in "Cable," which starts with a lone drumbeat that gives the composition focus and conveyor-belt-like efficiency. Spurred on by the madcap vocals of singer Graham Ulicny, who alternates between a yelp and a growl, the band gets to work building layers of guitars, keys and synthesizers. The track reaches its peak at the minute mark, as an astonishing horn section pops up to lend each and every note an exclamation point. It's an all-in approach that suits Reptar well.