No Hits, No Problem: Captain Beefheart's Major Label Run In 1970, Warner Bros. Records had an unusual philosophy: they'd sign artists and, instead of wanting a hit single immediately, they'd develop them over several albums. Hence, Captain Beefheart.
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No Hits, No Problem: Captain Beefheart's Major Label Run

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No Hits, No Problem: Captain Beefheart's Major Label Run

No Hits, No Problem: Captain Beefheart's Major Label Run

No Hits, No Problem: Captain Beefheart's Major Label Run

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/396579254/396605027" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
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In 1970, Warner Bros. Records had an unusual philosophy: they'd sign artists and, instead of wanting a hit single immediately, they'd develop them over several albums. This way, James Taylor, Joni Mitchell, Little Feat, and Randy Newman got big career boosts. They also took a chance on Captain Beefheart, and although neither a hit single nor a hit album resulted, some very interesting music did. Fresh Air rock historian Ed Ward has the story.