Italy Rethinks Its Disdain For Restaurant Doggy Bags In Italy, taking restaurant leftovers home is considered vulgar. But now diners are being encourage to embrace the doggy bag to combat food waste. The push coincides with a food sustainability summit.

Italy Rethinks Its Disdain For Restaurant Doggy Bags

Italy Rethinks Its Disdain For Restaurant Doggy Bags

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In Italy, taking restaurant leftovers home is considered vulgar. But now diners are being encourage to embrace the doggy bag to combat food waste. The push coincides with a food sustainability summit.

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Renee Montagne. Taking leftovers home from a restaurant is a faux pas in France. In Italy, it's considered vulgar, though now Italy has a new campaign to sway diners to embrace the doggy bag - or cartoccio - to combat food waste. The push coincides with a summit there on global food sustainability. But the campaign has also enlisted a couple of Italy's celebrity chefs to glamorize the doggy bag cause. It's MORNING EDITION.

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