Beach Slang: Tiny Desk Concert James Snyder's euphoric punk anthems become raw and uplifting confessionals in this acoustic set — which includes a new song, "Too Late To Die Young."

Tiny Desk

Beach Slang

Beach Slang: Tiny Desk Concert

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/398529066/398544938" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

James Snyder writes songs as if he were in the room next door — hushed and vulnerable in his own space, but aware and perhaps even thrilled that someone might be listening. With Beach Slang, these uplifting confessionals become euphoric punk anthems about squeezing every second out of life. So it's telling and endearing that, when he played a solo acoustic set in the NPR Music offices, Snyder giggled with the nervous energy of a songwriter who's just been walked in on by a large group of strangers.

Last year, Beach Slang released a pair of 7" EPs — Who Would Ever Want Anything So Broken? and Cheap Thrills On A Dead End Street — that immediately became the stuff of punk singalongs. On stage with a full band, lines like "Kids like us are weird, and more, we're brave" (from "Filthy Luck") and "I get in trouble when things get quiet" (from "Dirty Cigarettes") are drowned out by distortion. But here, they take on a raw character, as they reflect the search for courage amid loneliness.

Beach Slang is in the middle of making its debut album, which is sure to be full of dirty-yet-pretty punk songs. At the Tiny Desk, Snyder previews a new song called "Too Late To Die Young," of which he says, "This will be on that, supposing they (at Beach Slang's label) think it's good enough." With just an acoustic guitar and Snyder's whispered rasp, he shakes as he sings, "I swear, right now I'm all right." It's quiet and elegiac now, but it's easy to imagine how the song will power through that uncertainty once Beach Slang plugs in.

Set List

  • "Filthy Luck"
  • "Too Late To Die Young"
  • "Dirty Cigarettes"
  • "Get Lost"

Credits

Producers: Lars Gotrich, Maggie Starbard; Audio Engineer: Kevin Wait; Videographers: Colin Marshall, Maggie Starbard; Assistant Producer: Annie Bartholomew; photo by Maggie Starbard/NPR

[+] read more[-] less

More From Tiny Desk

The Comet Is Coming performs during a Tiny Desk concert, on Oct. 2, 2019. (Catie Dull/NPR) Catie Dull/NPR hide caption

toggle caption Catie Dull/NPR

The Comet Is Coming

The Comet is Coming is a force of nature. The British trio makes the kind of instrumental jazz that takes music lovers out of their comfort zone and into a musical realm they may never have explored.

Weyes Blood performs during a Tiny Desk concert, on Oct. 7, 2019. (Mhari Shaw/NPR) Mhari Shaw/NPR hide caption

toggle caption Mhari Shaw/NPR

Weyes Blood

Watch the band perform a blissed-out, gently sweeping set featuring three songs from its latest album, Titanic Rising.

Raveena performs during a Tiny Desk concert, on Oct. 8, 2019. Catie Dull/NPR hide caption

toggle caption Catie Dull/NPR

Raveena

"I just want you to know," Raveena told the NPR office, "that in this space that we're in, you're extremely, extremely loved."

Freddie Gibbs performs during a Tiny Desk concert, on Sept. 26, 2019. (Mhari Shaw/NPR) Mhari Shaw/NPR hide caption

toggle caption Mhari Shaw/NPR

Freddie Gibbs And Madlib

The enigmatic and reclusive producer Madlib joins hard-hitting emcee Freddie Gibbs for one of the most memorable Tiny Desks of the year.

Raphael Saadiq with Lucky Daye performs during Tiny Desk Fest, on Oct. 31, 2019. (Mhari Shaw/NPR) Mhari Shaw/NPR hide caption

toggle caption Mhari Shaw/NPR

Raphael Saadiq

The godfather of 21st century soul electrified NPR's Tiny Desk Fest audience, with a little help from rising R&B star Lucky Daye.

Sheryl Crow performs during Tiny Desk Fest, on Oct. 29, 2019. Mhari Shaw/NPR hide caption

toggle caption Mhari Shaw/NPR

Sheryl Crow

Sheryl Crow's Tiny Desk Fest concert included a handful of early hits that have become pop standards.

Megan Thee Stallion plays a Tiny Desk Concert (Laura Beltran Villamizar/NPR). Laura Beltran Villamizar/NPR hide caption

toggle caption Laura Beltran Villamizar/NPR

Megan Thee Stallion

The budding superstar debuted a new song with Phony Ppl and performed hits from Fever and Tina Snow during the first night of NPR's Tiny Desk Fest.

Black Uhuru plays a Tiny Desk Concert. Claire Harbage/NPR hide caption

toggle caption Claire Harbage/NPR

Black Uhuru

The influential reggae group, whose name means "black freedom," brought songs of solidarity and love to the Tiny Desk.

Mereba performs during a Tiny Desk concert, on Sept. 17, 2019. Mhari Shaw/NPR hide caption

toggle caption Mhari Shaw/NPR

Mereba

A nomadic storyteller with a cross-genre style ranging from folk to rap, Mereba slays the devil in her solo set behind the Desk.

Carly Ray Jepsen performs during Tiny Desk on Nov. 13. (Photo by Mhari Shaw/NPR) Mhari Shaw/NPR hide caption

toggle caption Mhari Shaw/NPR

Carly Rae Jepsen

The singer brought a sparkling pop-disco vibe and a lot of swagger to the sun-filled Tiny Desk.

Back To Top