Ukulele Orchestra Tries To Break Record Over the weekend, 4,750 ukulele players traveled from all over French Polynesia to Tahiti to play "Bora Bora E." The attempt is being verified to see if the record was broken
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Ukulele Orchestra Tries To Break Record

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Ukulele Orchestra Tries To Break Record

Ukulele Orchestra Tries To Break Record

Ukulele Orchestra Tries To Break Record

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Over the weekend, 4,750 ukulele players traveled from all over French Polynesia to Tahiti to play "Bora Bora E." The attempt is being verified to see if the record was broken

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Renee Montagne. And what we're hearing is in ukulele orchestra of 4,750 strumming the tune "Bora Bora E." Over the weekend, players traveled from all over French Polynesia to Tahiti, aiming to set a record. Even the country's president played. The Polynesian group says they harmonized for a full five minutes, which would crush the Guinness record by more than 2000 ukuleles. It's MORNING EDITION.

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