Minn. Senators Still May Not Make Eye Contact During Floor Debates It's hard to get politicians to see eye to eye. But it in Minnesota's state Senate, it's actually against the rules. The latest effort to change the rule failed.

Minn. Senators Still May Not Make Eye Contact During Floor Debates

Minn. Senators Still May Not Make Eye Contact During Floor Debates

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It's hard to get politicians to see eye to eye. But it in Minnesota's state Senate, it's actually against the rules. The latest effort to change the rule failed.

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Good morning, I'm Renee Montagne. It's hard to get politicians to see eye to eye. In Minnesota's State Senate, it's actually against the rules. Senators are banned from making eye contact during floor debates. It's meant to keep debates from getting too personal. Yesterday, some senators tried to end what they call an antiquated rule. After being voted down, one House member mock tweeted, other Senate rules - use secret handshake and drag Stone of Shame if you violate a rule. It's MORNING EDITION.

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