Randy Newman On Mountain Stage The show dips into its 30-year archive to revisit the singer-songwriter's first appearance in 1999.

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Brian Blauser/Mountain Stage

Randy Newman.

Brian Blauser/Mountain Stage

Mountain Stage

Randy Newman On Mountain Stage

Randy Newman On Mountain Stage

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Mountain Stage dips into its 30-year live-music archive to revisit Randy Newman's first appearance on the show in May 1999. Newman is one of the nation's most decorated musicians; as host Larry Groce says in his introduction, "If you started with Stephen Foster to the present, Randy Newman would have to be included in the great songwriters of America. His songs express part of the American psyche that no other songwriter has expressed so well, or maybe not even at all."

Through the years, Newman's songs have been covered by everyone from Judy Collins, Harry Nilsson and Bette Midler to Three Dog Night and Joe Cocker. Newman has also worked extensively as a film composer, writing scores for The Natural, James And The Giant Peach, Meet The Parents, Seabiscuit and seven Pixar films, just to name a few. Newman appears here solo, playing piano and covering tunes from across his career, including "Short People," "Dixie Flyer" and "You Can Leave Your Hat On."

SET LIST

  • "It's Money That I Love"
  • "Birmingham"
  • "Short People"
  • "Karl Marx"
  • "You Can Leave Your Hat On"
  • "Dayton"
  • "I Miss You"
  • "Louisiana 1927"
  • "Great Nations Of Europe"
  • "Dixie Flyer"
  • "Feels Like Home"
  • "Sail Away"
  • "Political Science"
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