Tales Of Environmental Activism The Rhode Island Tree Council wants to set the record for hugging trees on Saturday. And, Christopher Swain, a clean-water advocate, swam in New York's most polluted canal. He said it tasted bad.

Tales Of Environmental Activism

Tales Of Environmental Activism

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The Rhode Island Tree Council wants to set the record for hugging trees on Saturday. And, Christopher Swain, a clean-water advocate, swam in New York's most polluted canal. He said it tasted bad.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Good morning, I'm Steve Inskeep with tales of environmental activism. The Rhode Island Tree Council wants volunteers tomorrow in Roger Williams State Park; 1,202 people can set a record for hugging trees - actual tree huggers. Their work is easier than that of Christopher Swain. The clean water advocate swam in New York's most polluted canal. He said the Gowanus Canal tasted like mud, poop, ground-up grass, detergent, gasoline. It was like swimming through a dirty diaper. It's MORNING EDITION.

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