When A Caller Claims He's The Pope, Be Careful: He May Be Telling The Truth When Franco Rabuffi's phone rang, the caller said it was Pope Francis. Rabuffi promptly hung up the phone. It turns out that it was actually Pope Francis — which Rabuffi realized on the third try.

When A Caller Claims He's The Pope, Be Careful: He May Be Telling The Truth

When A Caller Claims He's The Pope, Be Careful: He May Be Telling The Truth

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When Franco Rabuffi's phone rang, the caller said it was Pope Francis. Mr. Rabuffi hung up the phone. It turns out that it was actually Pope Francis — which Rabuffi realized only on the caller's third try. The pope makes a habit of calling those who are suffering, and he invited Rabuffi and his wife for a meeting.

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Good morning. I'm David Greene. When Franco Rabuffi's phone rang, the caller said it was Pope Francis. Mr. Rabuffi hung up the phone. The phone rang again - same thing. Mr. Rabuffi hung up again. It turns out it was actually Pope Francis, which Rabuffi realized on the third try. A Vatican newspaper says the pope likes to call people who are suffering. No details about Rabuffi's condition, but he and his wife were invited to meet the pope. Francis hugged Rabuffi and told him it really was him on the line. It's MORNING EDITION - really.

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Correction May 5, 2015

An early Web version of this story did not accurately reflect its audio version.