Panel Round Two More questions for the panel: Chris Christie: New York Giant, Pizza Hook Up, Geeks vs. Greeks.
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Panel Round Two

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Panel Round Two

Panel Round Two

Panel Round Two

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More questions for the panel: Chris Christie: New York Giant, Pizza Hook Up, Geeks vs. Greeks.

PETER SAGAL, HOST:

In just a minute, after years on the run, Bill turns himself in for war rhymes.

(LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: It's the Listener Limerick Challenge. If you'd like to play, give us a call at 1-888-WAIT-WAIT - that's 1-888-924-8924. Right now, panel, some more questions for you from the week's news. Luke, according to a new report from a government watchdog group, during his time in office, Gov. Chris Christie has spent over $80,000 of taxpayer money on what?

LUKE BURBANK: A bagel at Whole Foods.

(LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: They are fresh.

BURBANK: Yes.

SAGAL: No, not that, although you're in the right arena, if you will.

BURBANK: On food.

SAGAL: Yes.

(SOUNDBITE OF BELL)

PAULA POUNDSTONE: Wow.

SAGAL: Specifically where?

BURBANK: Football games.

SAGAL: Yes. He spent $80,000 on the concessions at a football stadium. According to watchdog.org, over the course of two football seasons, Christie spent more than $80,000 for food and drink at MetLife Stadium in New Jersey. It's almost understandable if you were to imagine him, the governor of New Jersey, at a New Jersey sporting event in the luxury box, entertaining guests of the state. But then we found out the bill included 5,000 hot dogs, 8,000 chocolate malts and just one funnel.

(LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: OK. We know making fat jokes about Chris Christie is tired, it's cliched. We had given it up. We had sworn it off. And then he went and did something like this.

POUNDSTONE: He must have just had one - you know how they go like, you know, get your snow cones, get your snow cone - they must have just said one guy circling him all the time.

SAGAL: Yeah.

GABE LIEDMAN: Or is it possible he bought a round for the house?

SAGAL: It's possible. Hey everybody, what do you want for lunch? Luke, the dating app Tinder is used mainly for hooking up with strangers. But a woman in Chicago found it can also be used for what?

BURBANK: Getting someone to bring her a hot dog at a Cubs game?

SAGAL: That is so close, I'm going to give it to you. It is getting people - men - to bring her pizza.

(SOUNDBITE OF BELL)

POUNDSTONE: Wow.

(APPLAUSE)

LIEDMAN: Wow.

SAGAL: The fact that you just thought of that is both impressive and scary. According to the Chicago Sun-Times, one woman in Chicago, who they only call Kate, has found a way to leverage male desperation into a food source. When she gets hungry, she swipes right in every guy she finds on Tinder and, of course, somebody's going to swipe right back. And then right away, she lays it out for the guy. She says I don't really want to talk to you. I just want some pizza. If you send me a pizza, I might talk to you. And she gets pizzas 'cause guys send her pizzas.

POUNDSTONE: Well, I can't help feeling this may have been how Chris Christie rang up his bill.

SAGAL: It's possible.

(LAUGHTER)

LIEDMAN: Also, do they - do they know if Kate is actually a woman? 'Cause I think I just figured out how to get a free pizza later tonight.

SAGAL: Yeah, I...

(LAUGHTER)

POUNDSTONE: Yes. I don't have Tinder 'cause I use a flip phone, but...

(LAUGHTER)

LIEDMAN: I think that's called Hinder.

POUNDSTONE: Yeah. No, it works as a divining rod.

(LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: Paula, Columbia University has been asked to reconsider its classes on Greek mythology.

POUNDSTONE: Yes.

SAGAL: Why?

POUNDSTONE: Because a lot of people don't believe in those stories.

SAGAL: No.

POUNDSTONE: I don't know. Give me a hint.

SAGAL: Well, imagine if you...

POUNDSTONE: Just say it.

SAGAL: ...Just walk innocently into class and of course, it turns out that you were, in fact, sired by woman and a swan? How would you feel?

(LAUGHTER)

POUNDSTONE: Um - be...

(LAUGHTER)

POUNDSTONE: Are you saying I wasn't?

(LAUGHTER)

POUNDSTONE: I have no idea.

SAGAL: Do either of you two gentlemen know?

BURBANK: Would it be uncomfortable because of, like, a trigger warning-type situation?

SAGAL: Yes, it's a trigger warning-type of situation.

(SOUNDBITE OF BELL)

POUNDSTONE: What's a trigger warning?

SAGAL: Now, imagine, again - I mean, you may laugh, you'll say they're just Greek myths...

POUNDSTONE: (Laughter).

SAGAL: ...Technically - thank you.

(LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: They're teaching Ovid's "Metamorphoses," of course, as ancient classic literature. But - and its beautiful and it's literature and it's part of the canon - but imagine if you...

POUNDSTONE: I'm trying to pretend that I understand every word of that...

SAGAL: Yes.

(LAUGHTER)

POUNDSTONE: Ovid's "Metamorphoses," part of the canon - yes, yes...

(LAUGHTER)

POUNDSTONE: Yes.

(LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: Well, imagine if you walked into that class...

POUNDSTONE: That's exactly what I was just thinking. I was thinking about Ovid's "Metamorphoses..."

(LAUGHTER)

POUNDSTONE: ...As being part of the canon. I watch "Boardwalk Empire."

(LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: That's a pretty good show, though.

POUNDSTONE: Great show. It's not part Ovid's "Metamorphoses." So - OK, so they didn't want them to teach that class because it might - it would...

SAGAL: Trigger.

POUNDSTONE: ...You - and how did you know about the trigger? All right...

BURBANK: Because I - because I was left on a hillside to die and came back and somehow ended up marrying my mother...

SAGAL: Yeah.

BURBANK: ...And killing my father.

POUNDSTONE: Oh, Jeez.

BURBANK: And if I hear about it one more time...

LIEDMAN: That explains...

BURBANK: ...I'm going to be triggered.

(LAUGHTER)

POUNDSTONE: Yeah, so that - that'll set you off.

(APPLAUSE)

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