Stuffed Tiger, Camera-Stealing Elephant Get Attention Police in Washington responded to a call about a Bengal tiger — turns out it was a stuffed animal. In Thailand, an elephant grabbed a tourist's camera. Instead of a selfie, can we call it an elfie?
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Stuffed Tiger, Camera-Stealing Elephant Get Attention

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Stuffed Tiger, Camera-Stealing Elephant Get Attention

Stuffed Tiger, Camera-Stealing Elephant Get Attention

Stuffed Tiger, Camera-Stealing Elephant Get Attention

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/408680058/408680059" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Police in Washington responded to a call about a Bengal tiger — turns out it was a stuffed animal. In Thailand, an elephant grabbed a tourist's camera. Instead of a selfie, can we call it an elfie?

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Steve Inskeep with wildlife news. Police in Washington state responded to an emergency call - a Bengal tiger was sitting on top of a car. The Columbian Newspaper reports police discovered it was a stuffed animal. Then there's the elephant in Thailand which reached out and grabbed a tourist's camera. Seconds later, the camera took a time lapse photo of the elephant. So the elephant took a selfie, or, as it's being called, an elphie. It's MORNING EDITION.

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