The Protest Song Is Not Dead The era of the protest song might seem gone, but NPR Music host Jason King has curated a 100-hour-long playlist of R&B, soul, funk and hip-hop protest music that spans decades (including this one).
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The Protest Song Is Not Dead

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The Protest Song Is Not Dead

The Protest Song Is Not Dead

The Protest Song Is Not Dead

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/408747176/408827542" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
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The singer Gregory Porter's music is usually classified as jazz, but his soulful voice fits in Jason King's wide-ranging playlist of protest music. Shawn Peters/Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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Shawn Peters/Courtesy of the artist

The singer Gregory Porter's music is usually classified as jazz, but his soulful voice fits in Jason King's wide-ranging playlist of protest music.

Shawn Peters/Courtesy of the artist

When Prince released his new song, "Baltimore," in the aftermath of the death of Freddie Gray, it was striking mostly because it was an original; it's unusual to hear protest music from today's mainstream pop stars. But R&B, rap and soul musicians have always found ways to contribute during turbulent times, says NPR Music writer Jason King.

To prove his point, King has curated a 100-hour playlist of protest songs that spans decades — from the O'Jays and Nina Simone to D'Angelo, Gregory Porter and John Legend. That playlist is streaming on I'll Take You There, NPR Music's R&B channel, through the long weekend.

King joined NPR's Audie Cornish to talk about his choices. You can hear their conversation at the audio link above before heading over to the stream.