Bees Were Literally Gao Bingguo's Knees Gao Binggua of China wanted to break the record for wearing the heaviest coat of bees: 240 pounds of bees. To attract the swarm, Bingguo had several queen bees placed on his body.
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Bees Were Literally Gao Bingguo's Knees

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Bees Were Literally Gao Bingguo's Knees

Bees Were Literally Gao Bingguo's Knees

Bees Were Literally Gao Bingguo's Knees

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/410470331/410477453" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
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Gao Binggua of China wanted to break the record for wearing the heaviest coat of bees: 240 pounds of bees. To attract the swarm, Bingguo had several queen bees placed on his body.

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Good morning. I'm David Greene. Suffering for fashion is one thing. Then there's the outfit chosen by Gao Binggua. He went for a new record for wearing the heaviest coat of bees - 240 pounds of bees. To attract the swarm, Binggua had several queen bees placed on this body. Then assistants dumped boxes of worker bees at his feet beneath the coat of 1.1 million bees, just his undies and more than 2,000 stings. Adding insult, Guinness told Huffington Post they've never heard of this guy. It's MORNING EDITION.

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