Soaked Texans Brace For More Storms After 7 More Inches Of Rain Fall More rain is forecast this weekend in North Texas after up to 7 inches fell last night across parts of the state, causing colonies of fire ants and snakes to take shelter in houses.
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Soaked Texans Brace For More Storms After 7 More Inches Of Rain Fall

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Soaked Texans Brace For More Storms After 7 More Inches Of Rain Fall

Soaked Texans Brace For More Storms After 7 More Inches Of Rain Fall

Soaked Texans Brace For More Storms After 7 More Inches Of Rain Fall

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More rain is forecast this weekend in North Texas after up to 7 inches fell last night across parts of the state, causing colonies of fire ants and snakes to take shelter in houses.

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

Showers and thunderstorms likely.

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

That's the National Weather Service's forecast for Dallas tomorrow, and it's not what Texans want to hear.

SIEGEL: Last night, up to seven more inches of rain fell in the north of the state. Rescue crews helped hundreds of people escape from waterlogged cars and inundated homes. They found one body, bringing the number killed in these May storms to 25. Dennis Cavanaugh, a meteorologist at the National Weather Service, tried to convey just how much rain is falling.

DENNIS CAVANAUGH: So that would cover the entire state of Texas in eight inches deep of water. That equates to a little over 35 trillion gallons of water.

CORNISH: There's so much water that snakes have been taking shelter in houses above the waterline. Colonies of fire ants have been roused and an alligator had to be moved out of a parking garage.

SIEGEL: Katie Carter (ph) and her 4-year-old son went out today to see what the storms have done to their neighborhood park just north of Dallas. Mickey (ph) Carter put it this way.

MICKEY CARTER: Too deepy.

KATIE CARTER: It's too deepy?

CORNISH: Too deepy, indeed.

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