Japanese Author Builds Monument To Honor Dead Insects It shows a man with his head bent, bowing to a massive beetle crawling over a rock. Takeshi Yoro tells the Kyodo News agency, he hopes the monument will console the souls of the insects he has killed.

Japanese Author Builds Monument To Honor Dead Insects

Japanese Author Builds Monument To Honor Dead Insects

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It shows a man with his head bent, bowing to a massive beetle crawling over a rock. Takeshi Yoro tells the Kyodo News agency, he hopes the monument will console the souls of the insects he has killed.

ARI SHAPIRO, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Ari Shapiro. In Japan, Takeshi Yoro is a best-selling author and insect obsessive. A few years ago, he was in a movie called "Beetle Queen Conquers Tokyo." And now he has created a new monument at a Japanese Temple. It shows a man with his head bent bowing to a massive beetle crawling over a rock. Yoro tells the Kyodo News agency he hopes the monument will console the souls of all the dead insects he's collected. It's MORNING EDITION.

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