Panel Round One Our panelists answer questions about the week's news: Don't feed or drink the camels.
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Panel Round One

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Panel Round One

Panel Round One

Panel Round One

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Our panelists answer questions about the week's news: Don't feed or drink the camels.

MIKE PESCA, HOST:

Right now, panel, time for you to answer some questions about this week's new. Maz, the MERS outbreak continues to spread, and the World Health Organization is stepping up its fight. Namely, they are asking people to, despite the temptation, to stop drinking what?

MAZ JOBRANI: Water?

PESCA: Well, I'll give you a hint. It is worse when your camel has eaten asparagus.

JOBRANI: Pee.

PESCA: Camel pee, yeah.

(SOUNDBITE OF BELL)

JOBRANI: Stop drinking camel pee.

PESCA: Stop. Fight the urge to drink camel urine.

AMY DICKINSON: What are we going to do in the green room?

JOBRANI: Can I start tomorrow, please?

PESCA: Fine, OK.

(LAUGHTER)

PESCA: The latest outbreak of MERS or Middle Eastern Respiratory Syndrome has prompted the World Health Organization, or the WHO, to release a document called, Who's On MERS?

(LAUGHTER)

PESCA: They say, quote, "people should avoid drinking camel urine." Again, this instruction is under MERS guidelines, not under Things I Can't Believe We Had To Tell You.

(LAUGHTER)

JOBRANI: You know, I'm Jewish. So I can't drink the pee of a cloven-hoofed animal.

DICKINSON: That's right.

JOBRANI: So I would not - I would not be tricking camel pee.

(APPLAUSE)

DICKINSON: Right. Except camels I don't think have cloven hooves.

JOBRANI: Don't they?

DICKINSON: But goats - or cows. That would be a problem.

JOBRANI: Let me make a list of the animals whose pee I cannot drink.

(LAUGHTER)

JOBRANI: OK, so cows, yes.

(LAUGHTER)

PESCA: Well, I think the World Health Organization is really worried because camel urine's widely known as a gateway urine.

(LAUGHTER)

PESCA: The next thing you know, it's giraffe urine. They're on to Tasmanian devil urine - LSD? - no, elephant pee.

(LAUGHTER)

JOBRANI: Can't we just give them water?

(LAUGHTER)

PESCA: I never thought of that.

JOBRANI: I'm thinking outside the box. Fuji Water - this is an opportunity for Fuji Water to just show up - be like, yo, stop drinking the pee. Try the Fuji.

(LAUGHTER)

JOBRANI: I'll be the spokesperson. Hi, I'm Maz Jobrani for Fuji Water.

PESCA: But you'd have to say, I used to drink loads and loads of camel pee.

(SOUNDBITE OF SONG, "MY HUMPS")

THE BLACK EYED PEAS: (Singing) Because of my hump, my hump, my hump, my hump, my hump, my hump, my hump, my hump, my lovely lady lumps.

PESCA: Coming up, our panelists are living the bro-life with Vinny Chase and the boys from "Entourage." It's Bluff The Listener. Call 1-888-WAIT-WAIT to play. We'll be back in a minute with more of WAIT WAIT ...DON'T TELL ME from NPR.

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