University Gives Texters Their Own Slow Lane Walking and texting was creating a problem at Utah Valley University. The school came up with a fix: It marked a slow lane on one of its stairwells just for students who are glued to their screens.
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University Gives Texters Their Own Slow Lane

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University Gives Texters Their Own Slow Lane

University Gives Texters Their Own Slow Lane

University Gives Texters Their Own Slow Lane

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  • Transcript

Walking and texting was creating a problem at Utah Valley University. The school came up with a fix: It marked a slow lane on one of its stairwells just for students who are glued to their screens.

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Renee Montagne with an update on a classic test for multitasking. You used to be asked if you could walk and chew gum at the same time. But walking and texting, that's hard. And it was creating headaches at Utah Valley University. Students there say they see distracted people walk into chairs or rails. So the school has a fix. It marked a slow lane on one of its stairwells just for students glued to their screens. It is MORNING EDITION.

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