Game Boy Glynn begins his academic career in video games.
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Game Boy

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Game Boy

Game Boy

Game Boy

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  • Transcript

Glynn begins his academic career in video games.

GLYNN WASHINGTON, HOST:

OK, so I start college, and I don't have a major. They're steady talking about what you want to do with your life? I have not a clue, but I like video games - you know, playing Pac-Man with my friends and such. So when the clipboard lady asks me if I enjoy computers, I say yeah, the kind that you can play. So she writes it down - computer science major. Well, you're going to need a rigorous mathematical background in order to get into the higher-level courses. She prints out my course schedule - analytic geometry II, elementary probability, differential equations. And yes, I know that I have the math aptitude of a turnip. I'm that self-aware, but I think maybe just being in the classes with these people, maybe something will finally click into place.

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WASHINGTON: My first days are bewildering. Everyone speaks a language I do not understand, so I wait for the fog to clear. I go to class, I nod, write things down in my little notebook, go to class, I nod, right things down in my little notebook. I power through, I listen. I open myself up to the instructions they are trying to impart. I'm optimistic, and I know it's just about to happen, just about to make sense. On my calendar, I can see it - several exams all scheduled for the same day. Whatever's going to happen has to happen before that fateful hour, something - a change, an aha moment, something, anything. And even on exam day, brushing my teeth, eating my cereal, walking toward my probability class, I expect this change to occur. And when the professor hands the exam to me and I see that it's written in an alien language, for maybe the first time I understand that whatever the clipboard lady thinks, video games are not in my future. Today on SNAP JUDGMENT, from PRX and NPR, we proudly present "Caught Up" - amazing stories from real people trying to go with the flow. My name is Glynn Washington. Please remember not to paddle upstream because you're listening to SNAP JUDGMENT.

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