A Do-Not-Fly List For The Do-Not-Tan Crowd A Scottish girl's natural pallor nearly kept her family from an overseas trip when airline workers declared her too sickly-looking to fly.
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A Do-Not-Fly List For The Do-Not-Tan Crowd

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A Do-Not-Fly List For The Do-Not-Tan Crowd

A Do-Not-Fly List For The Do-Not-Tan Crowd

A Do-Not-Fly List For The Do-Not-Tan Crowd

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/422490112/422490113" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Paul and Sheena Wain were on their way to the Maldives for vacation — but when they tried to check in for their flight in Manchester, England, the airline turned them down, saying their 14-year-old daughter Grace appeared pale, maybe sick.

In fact, Grace is red-haired and fair-skinned.

"We live in Scotland," her dad said. "That's just the way she is."

Grace was finally allowed to board after the family got a note from her doctor.

Then another indignity: The airline lost their luggage.