Kentucky Distillery Uses Subwoofers To Age Brandy The distillery has subwoofers next to barrels of brandy — convinced the thumping bass helps with the aging process. Some say vibrations make alcohol circulate more in the oak, adding to the flavor.

Kentucky Distillery Uses Subwoofers To Age Brandy

Kentucky Distillery Uses Subwoofers To Age Brandy

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The distillery has subwoofers next to barrels of brandy — convinced the thumping bass helps with the aging process. Some say vibrations make alcohol circulate more in the oak, adding to the flavor.

(SOUNDBITE OF SONG, "ROADHOUSE BLUES")

THE DOORS: (Singing) Let it roll, baby.

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Good morning, I'm David Greene. This is The Doors' "Roadhouse Blues." It's one of the songs being played at a Kentucky distillery for an audience of barrels. The Copper and Kings Distillery has put subwoofers next to barrels of brandy, convinced that the thumping bass helps with the aging process. Some do believe vibrations make alcohol circulate more inside the oak, adding to the flavor. Who knew the key to good brandy was good, good, good vibrations? It's MORNING EDITION.

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