Joey Alexander And Jazz Prodigies Through The Years How can a young student sing the blues if he hardly knows what it means to feel them? Jazz Night In America explores young phenoms of different eras, including 11-year-old pianist Joey Alexander.
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Joey Alexander And The Jazz Prodigy

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Joey Alexander And Jazz Prodigies Through The Years

Joey Alexander And Jazz Prodigies Through The Years

Joey Alexander And The Jazz Prodigy

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Joey Alexander. Signe Roderick/Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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Signe Roderick/Courtesy of the artist

Joey Alexander.

Signe Roderick/Courtesy of the artist

Sometimes, musical talent emerges at an astoundingly early age. Jazz is no stranger to teenage phenoms — or even pre-teen wonders — but the improviser faces creative challenges that other performers don't. How can a young student sing the blues if he hardly knows what it means to feel them?

Jazz Night In America explores prodigies through different eras, like pianist Joey Alexander — who was 11 when he performed the music heard in this episode at Jazz at Lincoln Center.