One Lawyer's Fight For Young Blacks And 'Just Mercy' : Fresh Air Human rights lawyer Bryan Stevenson represents those who have been abandoned. His clients are people on death row — abused and neglected children who were prosecuted as adults and placed in adult prisons where they were beaten and sexually abused, and mentally disabled people whose illnesses helped land them in prison where their special needs were unmet. "I'm not persuaded that the opposite of poverty is wealth," he says. "I've come to believe ... that the opposite of poverty is justice." David Edelstein reviews mountain climbing documentary 'Meru.'
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One Lawyer's Fight For Young Blacks And 'Just Mercy'

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One Lawyer's Fight For Young Blacks And 'Just Mercy'

One Lawyer's Fight For Young Blacks And 'Just Mercy'

One Lawyer's Fight For Young Blacks And 'Just Mercy'

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/433551781/434329326" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Human rights lawyer Bryan Stevenson represents those who have been abandoned. His clients are people on death row — abused and neglected children who were prosecuted as adults and placed in adult prisons where they were beaten and sexually abused, and mentally disabled people whose illnesses helped land them in prison where their special needs were unmet. "I'm not persuaded that the opposite of poverty is wealth," he says. "I've come to believe ... that the opposite of poverty is justice." David Edelstein reviews mountain climbing documentary 'Meru.'