Historian Elizabeth Archibald Examines Travel Tips From Medieval Times In The Washington Post, Elizabeth Archibald writes not much has changed. Like now, travelers back then were concerned about: getting along with others despite the "stupidities" of fellow companions.

Historian Elizabeth Archibald Examines Travel Tips From Medieval Times

Historian Elizabeth Archibald Examines Travel Tips From Medieval Times

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In The Washington Post, Elizabeth Archibald writes not much has changed. Like now, travelers back then were concerned about: getting along with others despite the "stupidities" of fellow companions.

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Good morning, I'm Renee Montagne. Labor Day being a big travel holiday, historian Elizabeth Archibald looked back at travel tips from Medieval times. In the Washington Post, she finds that, like today, Medieval travelers were offered tips on lodging, local phrases, food to carry like cured tongue and sights to see, mostly shrines. Then there's this travel warning by a pilgrim going by boat - book early, or you'll get a smelly seat. It's MORNING EDITION.

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