Governments Post Warnings To Prevent Fatal Selfies More people have been killed taking selfies this year than have died from shark attacks. The fatalities are driving authorities to put up warning signs in particularly popular and precarious places.

Governments Post Warnings To Prevent Fatal Selfies

Governments Post Warnings To Prevent Fatal Selfies

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More people have been killed taking selfies this year than have died from shark attacks. The fatalities are driving authorities to put up warning signs in particularly popular and precarious places.

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

Some kind of milestone may have been reached this year - more people have died taking selfies in 2015 than from shark attacks. Six people have died from shark attacks this year, but at least 12 people have been killed taking a selfie, often as they pose, strut or dangle in front imposing or precarious places. When people are fully engaged in the self-expression process of selfies, they may be too focused on themselves. Lin Qiu, who conducted the study for Nanyang Technical University, told the New York Daily News, they pay little attention to their surroundings, which may be inappropriate or dangerous. This rising tide of lethal selfies has prompted response around the world.

Authorities put a fence around a cliff of what's called the Wedding Cake Rock in Australia's Royal National Park because people had posted so many photos that showed them doing handstands on the cliff's edge. And Russian officials have put up posters in tourist spots that caution, a cool selfie could cost you your life. I'd like to propose another slogan, too - friends don't let friends drink and take selfies.

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