Ants Float Together To Survive Flood Conditions A video online shows the ants forming a life raft out of their own bodies. National Geographic says the ants do this to protect themselves and their eggs when the water rises.
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Ants Float Together To Survive Flood Conditions

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Ants Float Together To Survive Flood Conditions

Ants Float Together To Survive Flood Conditions

Ants Float Together To Survive Flood Conditions

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A video online shows the ants forming a life raft out of their own bodies. National Geographic says the ants do this to protect themselves and their eggs when the water rises.

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Renee Montagne. Historic flooding in South Carolina is sending people and other creatures searching for dry land, but fire ants are doing it their own way. A video online shows the ants forming a life raft out of their own bodies. National Geographic says the ants do this to protect themselves and their eggs when the water rises. Their hairs even form a layer of air to keep the ants on the bottom of the living raft from drowning. The ants can remain like this for days. It's MORNING EDITION.

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