Israeli Solders Deployed To Cities To Help Quell Attacks Israel's security forces continue to be challenged by a series of attacks that appear to be uncoordinated and spontaneous. Hundreds of soldiers are fanning out across Israel.

Israeli Solders Deployed To Cities To Help Quell Attacks

Israeli Solders Deployed To Cities To Help Quell Attacks

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Israel's security forces continue to be challenged by a series of attacks that appear to be uncoordinated and spontaneous. Hundreds of soldiers are fanning out across Israel.

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

An Israeli woman was on a street in Jerusalem yesterday. She was near the city's central bus station. And police say it was there that a Palestinian man stabbed her.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Authorities say the suspect tried to leave the scene on a bus, but police found him, opened fire and killed him. It was the latest variation in a series of attacks, mostly in Jerusalem.

MONTAGNE: In another incident yesterday, police said a 19-year-old Palestinian tried to stab police officers. They shot and killed him just outside the ancient walls of Jerusalem's Old City. Police spokesman Micky Rosenfeld says Israel is deploying troops and setting up roadblocks.

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MICKY ROSENFELD: That is necessary in order to prevent any further attacks taking place in Jerusalem or around any other areas of the capital.

MONTAGNE: In total, eight Israelis have been killed in attacks. And at least 31 Palestinians have been killed.

INSKEEP: In a speech yesterday, Palestinian President Mahmoud Abbas called the killings extrajudicial executions.

(SOUNDBITE OF SPEECH)

PRESIDENT MAHMOUD ABBAS: (Through interpreter) It is threatening peace and stability and is threatening to spark a religious conflict that would burn everything, not only in the region but also in the whole world.

INSKEEP: So that's Mahmoud Abbas.

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