The Queen Of The Organ Was A Donor To Philadelphia Scott was one of the great jazz organ players of her time. But her most enduring impact may be in the jam sessions she hosted in her hometown — and the artists who emerged from it.

Jazz is taught at universities now, and artists like saxophonist Tim Warfield and trumpeter Terell Stafford teach at them. But they know that jazz is taught more through listening than reading; more on the bandstand than the classroom. And they learned those lessons from the organ giant Shirley Scott, who died in 2002.

Known as the "queen of the organ," Scott was one of several Philadelphians who developed the electric Hammond B-3 into a viable instrument for a soulful, bluesy style of jazz. With dozens of recordings to her name, she was already a major voice when she became the leader of the house band at Ortlieb's Jazzhaus. Among the young players who timidly found their way onto the stage at Ortlieb's were Warfield and Stafford — and, in doing so, they got a lot more than they bargained for.

In this documentary short, Jazz Night In America remembers Shirley Scott through the tales of two of her final proteges and bandmates.

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Becca Stevens and Nathan Schram perform at home. Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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Becca Stevens And Nathan Schram: Alone Together Duets

WBGO and Jazz At Lincoln Center

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Becky Harlan/WBGO

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WBGO and Jazz At Lincoln Center

Jon Batiste was born for show business. Hear him play an intimate set in New York and on our radio show as we trace his story to his current gig as band leader of The Late Show with Stephen Colbert.

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